The Fashion Fence: Luxury Brands and their Social Media Strategy

Lace Fence' Project by Dutch Design House Demakersvan; Courtesy of I. CordalÂ

By: Amanda Montgomery, guest blogger

When we were growing up and often fighting with our siblings then tattling on them immediately to start trouble your wise parents probably said,

“There are 2 sides to every story. Let me see what your brothers/sisters have to say.”

In a recent article for Forbes, journalist Lauren Indvik approached the story surrounding luxury brands (Jimmy Choo, Burberry, Marc Jacobs, etc) and what occurs when these labels attempt to incorporate social media into their marketing campaigns.

As it turns out, there are several sides to the story about whether social media will generate an increase in sales, and more importantly raise top-of-mind awareness for luxury brands.

Indvik’s article references that to one extent certain luxury brands dismiss emerging media marketing efforts because what makes their brand luxurious in the first place is the ability to remain ‘exclusively reserved’ to the most elite target audience demographic.

When they bring in a networking platform like Facebook, Twitter, or Yelp – which primarily features user generated content – the brand’s exclusivity factor vanishes because that label becomes readily open to the public masses online.

However, because user generated content, and social networking technology platforms have saturated the marketing landscape relentlessly even the most premier labels must bring in some level of social media marketing or risk falling behind.

As Indvik points out,

“Dozens of high-end fashion, jewelry and travel firms have released image and video-rich apps for Apple’s iPhone and iPad devices over the past three years as well.”

Moreover, several high-end fashion labels like Burberry and Christian Louboutin are using emerging media as an artistic outlet when incorporating new media into their website and shopping experience.

Courtesy of 'Sandi in the City' Blog

By featuring video, photography, paintings, and more, these brands see new media platforms as another way to showcase the artistic imagery emerging from their brand.

In a way these efforts touch on the foundation of haute couture, because fashion at its core is an art form.

Emerging media simply allows the fashion art form to flourish in a new, accessible way.

To another extent it’s easier for certain luxury brands, which tote products designed for those in their early to mid 20s, to embrace social media and use it effectively when reaching out to their target audience.

As Indvik reports, consider how,

“Oscar de la Renta was even able to facilitate the purchase of a bridal gown after tweeting about a bridal trunk show taking place at Bergdorf Goodman.”

Courtesy of Twitter.com/OscarPRGirl

Whether one shops for a $2,500 clutch or $25 wallet, they more than likely researched their purchase online prior to buying and it’s even more likely that they belong to at least one social networking site.

Embracing social networking sites will only become more and more necessary as the technology continues to appeal to the masses. All brands must stake a presence or risk loosing their hold of market share.

When considering how, where, and what content to highlight via social media vehicles like Facebook and Twitter, a company’s marketing strategy must also consider technology’s powerful potential.

As Chief Creative Officer Christopher Bailey wrote on Twitter,

“Burberry is now as much a media-content company as [it is] a design company because it’s all part of the overall experience.”

Today, the brand experience happens everywhere—on your cell phone, in your car, at a museum, and of course online.

To spread their brand experience and continue to maintain an increase in sales, leaders at the world’s most renowned fashion houses must consider social media’s ability to affect their brand and act accordingly.

(source)


Amanda Montgomery
is a proud University of Alabama alumnus, and one of the youngest Social Media Specialists with the firm Social Media Delivered. She helps clients orchestrate and execute strategic, creative and successful community content campaigns. As a Recruitment Supervisor, Montgomery also serves as the Intern Committee Chair.  Amanda is currently pursuing a Master’s degree at the University of Texas-Dallas in Emerging Media & Communication. She is an active member of the Dallas Ad League, the Dallas Press Club, and the Dallas Contemporary Foundation.  Connect with her via Twitter, @acmontgomery or at LinkedIn.com/in/AmandaMontgomery.

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Comments

  1. Andrea Rosenfeld says:

    Interesting article – thank you!

    I agree that utilizing the social media movement will bring visibility but luxury items aren't primarily purchased online, unless the client has touched it in the store, first or it's on a bargain-site with a timer running. I create art jewelry. My work doesn't sell through a photograph, solely, not at luxury prices. My client wants to try it on, feel the weight, see the stones. I thing that most luxury items require, not only tactile emotion, but also the store ambiance and being “waited on”.

    If one is spending thousands of dollars, one wants a connection with the item and the brand it stem from.

    Andrea Rosenfeld
    kinetic artist

  2. Andrea Rosenfeld says:

    Interesting article – thank you!

    I agree that utilizing the social media movement will bring visibility but luxury items aren't primarily purchased online, unless the client has touched it in the store, first or it's on a bargain-site with a timer running. I create art jewelry. My work doesn't sell through a photograph, solely, not at luxury prices. My client wants to try it on, feel the weight, see the stones. I thing that most luxury items require, not only tactile emotion, but also the store ambiance and being “waited on”.

    If one is spending thousands of dollars, one wants a connection with the item and the brand it stem from.

    Andrea Rosenfeld
    kinetic artist