{iStyle} First-Ever Plus-Size Runway Show Debuts at NYFW 2010

By: Kelly Ahern, guest blogger

You do not have to be stick thin and epically proportioned to love fashion– so why does that seem to be a prerequisite to market it?

Whether it is working the catwalk, posing in an editorial or flaunting the latest trends across strategically placed billboards, models make their presence known.

Each entices the viewer to take a closer look at the brand they are representing, and inevitably are used to spark a connection and build relationships with the consumer.

Why then do they tend to represent an insignificant percentage of style connoisseurs?

According to the British Association of Modeling Agents (AMA), “female models should be around 34-24-34 in (86-61-86 cm) and between 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m) and 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) tall”.

The AMA goes on to list a wealth of other requirements such as “clear skin, good hands, nails and teeth, healthy hair and regular features”.

Just curious but what exactly are considered “regular” features?

Slowly, the fashion industry has become wise to the fact that these qualifications aren’t necessarily the norm.

Clothing is created for all people and should be modeled for all people. Fashionistas come in all shapes and sizes and so should those who promote the collections.

Super stylish Hollywood starlets such as Nikki Blonsky, Gabourey Sidibe, model Emme and KayCee Stroh, got to witness the progression of the fashion industry first hand Wednesday, as they sat front row during New York Fashion Week’s first-ever plus-size runway show.

Blonsky commented on the catwalk in a recent post from PEOPLE stating, “This is a milestone in the plus-size community. We’ve never had anything like this”.

Plus-size model Emme, who had the opportunity to host the red carpet, praised the show telling PEOPLE, “you have to join forces to make a statement and to be part of a revolution. It’s monumental in its reach. I think the big statement that’s going to be made with this fashion show is not only going to be made within the full-figured community but I think it’s going to talk to the bottom line of design houses, designers, and business people involved in fashion”.

Although the event was not held in conjunction with IMG Fashion Week, it was held in close proximity, right next door at The Atrium in Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall.

Collections which were shown included Avenue, Jessica London, Women Within, Ellos and La Redoute. The show consisted of eighteen different models; among them Lizzie Miller and Tocarra Jones.

The show’s sponsor, OneStopPlus.com, has a distinct mission—to prove that the 62% of American Women who are plus-size can also experience the high-fashion lifestyle.

OneStopPlus.com’s VP of Design, Zahir Babvani, stated in a press release that, “this show is a collaborative effort to provide the extraordinary community of plus-size American women with the uncompromising style that they have always deserved but never received. It’s about inclusion and fashion democracy: fashion risk-taking and empowerment. No more seeing what you can’t have; this is a fashion party that invites and inspires everyone”.

Tuesday’s event championed fashion in its purest form and proved that the industry itself truly is evolving.

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Kelly Ahern is a recent Roger Williams Univeristy graduate living in New England. She graduated with a degree in Communications-Public Relations and a Core Concentration in Italian. She is an aspiring PR professional who loves social media, fashion and traveling. You can find her on Twitter @Kelly_Ahern.

Copyright © 2009-2010 Sasha H. Muradali. All Rights Reserved.

Comments

  1. I think this will allow women, who already haven't experienced it yet, to get to know what type of shirt, fabric, or fit can work with their figure. That's the true statement in fashion.

  2. This is fantastic! I fall into that 62% and am constantly appalled by the “fashion” that is available for women over size 8. It is possible to be healthy and attractive at size 14 or size 16. It just would be nice to have clothing that looks nice for that size range.

  3. This is fantastic! I fall into that 62% and am constantly appalled by the “fashion” that is available for women over size 8. It is possible to be healthy and attractive at size 14 or size 16. It just would be nice to have clothing that looks nice for that size range.