{Rules of PR no.33} Great Expectations of an Avatar Kind

A curious thing, expectations. Charles Dickens had called them ‘Great’ and they are these little material points that either make you soar above the clouds beyond the depths Icarus achieved or fall to your knees and bleed in some horrendous fashion that is most unseemly.

I, like everyone else, had been hearing about James Cameron’s epic film-adventure, Avatar, for months prior to its December 18 US release. But I, unlike some of those ‘everyone else,’ did not set the film up for failure due to astronomical unrealistic expectations.

Though, it can be argued that part of those unrealistic expectations fall at the hands of Cameron and the Avatar crew themselves for calling the film, a game changer:-

“We know people will be watching us, and that’s OK,” Cameron said. “We blew ourselves up real big earlier this year (in spreading word about the movie) to scare away other 3-D movies from this weekend. Now we have to prove ourselves.”

And prove themselves, they have… or have they not?

Well, according to Mr. Beaks over at Ain’t It Cool, regardless of his witty, faux-endearing tones of melodramatic lust for science fiction — the film has not. Interestingly enough, he’s not the only one on that side of the fence. The Internet Movie Database (8.9 of 10 Stars on December 20, 2009) Message Board for the film lights up with a mixture of sentiments and ideas from opening-weekend-movie-goers. Some praising the film, others stating what a tragic disappointment it turned out to be. Even Bit Rebels dubbed the film  Much Ado About Nothing in a very Mr. Beaks type of fashion.

Very love-hate.

And a lot of this ‘talk’ sickly reminds of the weight upon George Lucas’ shoulders to produce Episodes I, II and III for Star Wars. Except, Cameron, unlike Lucas, had a blank slate to work upon.

USA Today called the film’s script ‘weak,’ but was quick to add, that no one would care about that because Avatar is just pretty to look at.

What were your expectations?

That’s an important factor in determining and dissecting tidbits of information of anything kind. Whether, that is a relationship, a film, a score of music, a person, a job — anything and everything has expectations attached to it.

But it’s how we set up those expectations and how we interact with them, once they have germinated, that will determine the final outcome of that relationship.

Make no mistake, expectations are relationships.  Think about client expectations or the expectations you have for yourself, your co-workers and even on a new campaign.

  • What about audience expectations?
  • Did your target audience live up to those of which you set for them?
  • Should you have set those expectations up in the first place?

Expectations are a natural and normal part of life, but how we thrust them into the palms of others — hoping they’ll share our perception — is another battle all together.

With Avatar, it’s very hit or miss and is a very good lesson on reach, influence and bias.

  • Did you walk into something with an already deduced bias?
  • Are your expectations realistic or unrealistic?
  • Will you take something at its face value, or are you willing to delve a little bit deeper?
  • Do your expectations hinder or enhance your goal? Are they at all related?
  • Most of all, what exactly are you expecting (details)? <– will determine what you receive and how you receive it.

Little Pink Book’s Rule of PR #33:
Set expectations worthy of being set.
Effective branding and PR strategies yield from
proper foresight, a tad of discretion and
a scarcity of arrogance — not ambition, don’t
mix the meaning of the two.


Me?

Well, I’m a geekette and I loved Avatar . I thought it was amazing in terms of story, effects, acting (or lack thereof) and, of course, music. James Horner is quite the composer. He’s no John Williams, but he’s very good at what he does regardless.

Avatar was like this gorgeous 3-D, colossal set of bio-luminescent wonderment that crossed Star Trek with Apocalypto eluding to some of the haunting lessons of from the original The Day the Earth Stood Still. It could even be Star Wars for a new generation 🙂

–

Sasha Muradali runs the ‘Little Pink Book’ . She holds a B.S. in Public Relations from the University of Florida with a minor in Dance (’07) and an M.A. in International Administration from the University of Miami(’08). She loves Twitter and all things social media, so you should find her @SashaHalima or get a copy of the ‘Little Pink Book’ delivered to your Kindle.

Copyright © 2009 Sasha H. Muradali. All Rights Reserved.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Comments

  1. I liked it but thought the story went a bit too long and was dragged on for a few moments. If they could have made it 40 minutes shorter I would have been happy. But than you wouldn't have the killer graphics and you couldn't enjoy them as much. So it was a lose/lose situation as far as the editing goes.

  2. I liked it but thought the story went a bit too long and was dragged on for a few moments. If they could have made it 40 minutes shorter I would have been happy. But than you wouldn't have the killer graphics and you couldn't enjoy them as much. So it was a lose/lose situation as far as the editing goes.